ATE Central

Drawing inspiration from natural intelligent sensor design, researchers at Penn State University have developed a number of solid-state biomimetic devices that provide unprecedented energy and area benefits for sensory computations. In particular, these researchers have mimicked auditory information processing in barn owl (Nature Communications, 10, 3450, 2019), collision avoidance by locust (Nature Electronics, 2020), and subthreshold signal detection by paddlefish and cricket using stochastic resonance (Nature Communications, 2020). Penn State researchers have also mimicked probabilistic computing in animal brains using low-power Gaussian synapses (Nature Communications, 10, 4199, 2019) and realized a biomimetic device that can emulate neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses (ACS Nano, 11, 3, 2017). These researchers use novel nano materials, nano devices, and in-memory computing architectures to demonstrate this new paradigm of sensing and computing. The goal is to deploy theses low-power and smart biomimetic devices at remote, inaccessible, and resource constrained locations.

Presenter: Saptarshi Das, Assistant Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics, and Materials Science and Engineering, Penn State University

Das Research Group at Penn State leads a new multidisciplinary area of science, namely biomimetic sensing and neuromorphic computing inspired by the neurobiological architecture and neural computational algorithms found inside various animal brains allowing evolutionary success of the species.

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