ATE Central

ATE Events — March 2021

Past

NCAT partner, CAAT is pleased to be working with the Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan and Women Who Drone organizations to provide 35 local Girl Scouts with an exciting opportunity to learn how to program and fly a drone. Girl Scout Cadettes will explore the world of microcontrollers and learn how to program a Robolink CoDrone Mini Programmable Drone in the FREE Girl Scouts Drone Programming Challenge. This will include a virtual session via Zoom, a video competition, and a live in-person drone flying competition.

The development of advanced thin-film synthesis techniques over the past several decades has sparked a renaissance in the design of nanomaterials for clean energy and quantum computing technologies. While it is now possible to produce oxide and semiconductor thin films in almost limitless configurations, the engineering of desirable functionality for device applications depends on precise control of atomistic structure and defects. Complex synthesis pathways can lead to significant deviations from idealized structures, which occur at length scales that are challenging to probe experimentally and theoretically. This task is further compounded by dynamic changes imparted by processing steps and subsequent exposure to extreme environments. Here Dr. Steven R. Spurgeon will discuss a materials design strategy based on the precision synthesis, theory calculations, and atomistic characterization, grounded in emerging data science tools that enable rich, quantitative analysis at scale. The results illustrate how the full range of information from modern, data-infused electron microscopy can unlock promising new materials for energy storage, electronics, and computing.

Register today for the global photonics digital conference. Enrich your work by attending the Photonics West Digital Forum, the premier laser, photonics, and biomedical optics event. Covering a wide range of topics: biomedical optics, biophotonics, industrial lasers, optoelectronics, microfabrication, MOEMS-MEMS, displays, and more.

A powerful week of content:

  • Live plenary talks
  • Technical presentations
  • Networking sessions
  • Product demonstrations
  • Digital Marketplace

The ABRF is the Association for Biomedical Research Facilities. ABRF members manage or work in core research facilities in companies, universities, and government.

The ABRF Annual Meeting is a premier event for advanced technology, education and cutting-edge research in shared scientific resource facilities worldwide, the ABRF Annual Meeting is a collaborative hub for technological innovation, sharing best practices, and professional development. The 2021 meeting features four days, covering the latest in bioinformatics, mass spectrometry based ‘omics, genomics, cytometry, imaging and core management.

Dr. Carmen Gomes aims to generate “new food for thought” and highlight the need for convergence between several domains, to address the challenges presented by manufacturing food, to feed the future ten billion. How can science and engineering help solve problems, which may arise, when we must replenish, and maintain inventories, in a manner that is sustainable, for public access to the most basic global public goods?

Perhaps the most important context is convergence and the evolution of new dynamic paradigms driven by consumer’s demand. Food is inextricably linked with energy, water and sanitation (FEWS). It can be easily extended to include healthcare. Hence, what is the “bigger” picture? FEWSH? What role(s) does technology play in this dynamic system?

Principles of convergence science will be applied to view food manufacturing through the lens of resource management, food production, nanotechnology development, economics, and consumer needs. “What is the future of (nano)technology in sustainable food manufacturing?”

“Hidden technologies” (antimicrobial materials, autonomous sensors, genetic engineering) as well as conventional technologies (unit processes, dairy processing systems, sensory panels) and the role that they play in sustainable food manufacturing will be discussed. In some cases, the application calls for unique attributes provided by nanotechnology.

This talk will cover new frontier research on phonon and hot carrier transport probing based on Raman scattering, a technology traditionally widely used for structure analysis. The team has developed a new technique, termed energy transport-state resolved Raman (ET-Raman). It is capable of probing physical transport processes down to nanosecond and picosecond scales and is able to simultaneously characterize the conjugated phonon transport in the in-plane and cross-plane directions and hot carriers diffusion in the in-plane direction. 2D materials down to monolayer thickness have been investigated for studying the structure effect on the in-plane thermal conductivity, interface thermal resistance, hot carrier diffusion coefficient/ mobility, and electron-hole radiative recombination. This provides an advanced phonon and electron transport study of virgin 2D materials. Also for the first time, the team has distinguished the temperatures of optical and acoustic phonons in 2D materials under photon excitation and characterized the energy coupling factor between them. Solving this decade-long problem presents a significant advance in measuring the intrinsic thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of 2D materials and will enable advanced material structure design toward thermal control and optimization.

Has your college been an ATE grantee? Did you have a "New to NSF" grant? Keep the momentum going! Take advantage of what ATE funding can do for your college's technician education programs and students by "Moving Up" to an ATE Project. What will help make your proposal be more competitive? How do requirements and reviewer expectations change when you take the next step? Where can you get help to make your proposal more competitive? Learn the answers to these questions along with strategies, insider tips, and mistakes to avoid in seeking your next ATE grant.

PRESENTERS: 

Elaine Craft, PI, Mentor-Connect (DUE 1501183 and 1840856) and other NSF ATE Grants (SCATE Center Director, retired), Florence-Darlington Technical College, SC
Elaine.Craft@fdtc.edu

Elizabeth (Liz) Teles, Former NSF ATE Program Director, Co-PI on two ATE Mentor-UP awards (DUE 1931264 and 2032835), VA
ejteles@yahoo.com

Pamela Silvers, PI, Computer Technologies Instructor, Skilled Workers Get Jobs NSF Grant (DUE 1800920), Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College (A-B Tech), NC
pamelajsilvers@abtech.edu

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has traditionally been the most frequently used micro-/nano- characterization technique to overcome the optical losses coming from lenses. This talk is going to begin by discussing the fundamental blocks of an SEM starting from the electron beam emission. Presenters will talk about the key concepts like working distance, beam current, aberration, and their effects on resolution and depth of focus. Beam specimen interactions will be categorized and studied. Various detection types will be introduced. Simple interactive Monte Carlo simulations will accompany the talk to understand the importance of low keV imaging. Furthermore, a very useful online tool that is available on myscope.training will be run together. The seminar will also connect to a Field Emission (FE) SEM tool remotely and carry out an actual demo with the participants. In the remaining time, the seminar will go over the basics of Electron Probe MicroAnalysis (EPMA) and compare it with the traditional SEM. Finally, the workshop will look into Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) characterization technique and see what kind of new information can be collected about the specimen. No prior experience in any of these characterization methods will be required for attendance. The talk will aim to discuss the basic ideas and guide the interested participants in the right direction to get a deeper understanding of the shared supplementary materials.

Target audience: post-secondary science and technology teachers, vocational-technical teachers, & school administrators who are investigating adding a Nanotechnology aspect to their curriculum.

The Business & Industry Leadership Team Model (BILT) is an employer high-engagement model for college programs, projects, and grants that originated with the NSF National Convergence Technology Center (DUE 1700530) in the early 2000s. The model is widely used to deepen employer involvement in educational programs producing such benefits as a curriculum better-aligned to meet employer needs, increased support for recruitment of students, and others. The two webinars on March 16 and 24 together will provide high-level coverage of the many specifics that make the model work.  The origins of the BILT will be explained to set the context; key details ranging from employer recruitment to using a structured, repeatable process for the employers to prioritize the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities desired in the “workforce-ready” graduates in the future will be explained; model variants for colleges, NSF ATE projects, and NSF ATE Centers will be discussed; resources will be identified, and questions will be answered. Participants who attend both sessions will receive a certificate of completion from MNT-EC.

Participants will learn how to set up personal nanoHUB dashboard and interact with different simulation tool interfaces, including Jupyter notebooks. MNT-EC will run nanoHUB simulation tools for visualizing crystal structures and biological molecules and learn how to find and bookmark self-paced lessons in nanoHUB on a wide range of topics, from nanotechnology labs to data science and machine learning. This workshop will also prepare you for upcoming workshops that explore specific applications and nanoHUB simulation tools in more depth. All are welcome! No prior coding or simulation experience necessary. 

The purpose of this webinar is to help those who have not been funded by NSF to develop fundable proposals. Topics include how to prepare a budget for your NSF ATE grant, what to include in each budget category, how to prepare a budget justification, how to align the budget and project description, and how to avoid common errors.

In this Paper Development Workshop, you will have an opportunity to work with members of the Cybersecurity Skills Journal Editorial Board and Peer Review Panel members in virtual breakout rooms during which prospective authors may present an idea for, or draft of, a manuscript reporting evidence-based practices, theoretical frameworks, or case studies of skilled application or instruction of cybersecurity tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs). The workshop's focuses for this year's PDW sessions is developing manuscripts for publication in the 2021 Special Issue on Diversifying the Cybersecurity Workforce.

The purpose of the PDW is two-fold. First, PDW aims to provide participants insights into the actionable steps they should take to make their research more relevant for cybersecurity practitioners, instructors, and/or researchers. Second, PDW provides practitioner and scholar authors with developmental feedback on their current projects related to advancing the assessment, development, or implementation of cybersecurity skills. The purpose of the PDW is broader, namely to improve the quality of cybersecurity research, to help develop and disseminate effective practices, and to bring practitioners and scholars into the conversation around skilled performance in cybersecurity.

When you register for the session, if you have not already done so, PDW asks that you submit a structured abstract describing your research. For information on the elements of a structured abstract please access the Cybersecurity Skills Journal web page at: csj.nationalcyberwatch.org

While there are volumes of interesting material on vacuum technology, this workshop will overview just a few of the core concepts. The workshop will focus on the foundations of vacuum technology used in advance manufacturing and some areas of material characterization, including the definition of vacuum, defining “how much” vacuum is needed, and how concepts, such as “mean free path”, have a direct consequence on the nanoscale material deposition. Vacuum system design and vacuum pump physics/design will help lead to a demonstration of a vacuum-based deposition tool at Normandale Community College, which is available on the RAIN network.

This session will outline how community colleges can empower their students to recognize, request, and foster more inclusive workplace practices.

Session participants will learn about practical tools developed through a community college-industry partnership to strengthen the working relationship between student interns and their internship mentors. This includes tools to help establish better training protocols, make workplace expectations more explicit, identify knowledge gaps and/or misunderstandings, and learn how to give and receive feedback so as to build greater trust and engagement.

After this session participants will be able to:

  • Describe inclusive workplace practices and how they foster engagement and productivity
  • Outline how non-inclusive practices can prevent success and retention of community college students in the workplace
  • Describe multiple tools/strategies students can use to recognize, request and foster more inclusive workplaces
  • Incorporate 1-2 tools/strategies in their courses/programs that students can use to recognize, request and foster more inclusive workplaces

In this Paper Development Workshop, you will have an opportunity to work with members of the Cybersecurity Skills Journal Editorial Board and Peer Review Panel members in virtual breakout rooms during which prospective authors may present an idea for, or draft of, a manuscript reporting evidence-based practices, theoretical frameworks, or case studies of skilled application or instruction of cybersecurity tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs). The workshop's focuses for this year's PDW sessions is developing manuscripts for publication in the 2021 Special Issue on Diversifying the Cybersecurity Workforce.

The purpose of the PDW is two-fold. First, PDW aims to provide participants insights into the actionable steps they should take to make their research more relevant for cybersecurity practitioners, instructors, and/or researchers. Second, PDW provides practitioner and scholar authors with developmental feedback on their current projects related to advancing the assessment, development, or implementation of cybersecurity skills. The purpose of the PDW is broader, namely to improve the quality of cybersecurity research, to help develop and disseminate effective practices, and to bring practitioners and scholars into the conversation around skilled performance in cybersecurity.

When you register for the session, if you have not already done so, PDW asks that you submit a structured abstract describing your research. For information on the elements of a structured abstract please access the Cybersecurity Skills Journal web page at: csj.nationalcyberwatch.org

Join for this wind-focused, day-long virtual workshop to explore the science of wind power!

During this 6-hour virtual workshop, educators will learn the foundations of wind power including the science and technology of wind turbines and blade design. The workshop will also introduce activities for the classroom that engage students in dynamic, hands-on energy-based learning.

Some things to know:

  • This workshop and the materials used are geared towards middle school and high school teachers.
  • No prior knowledge of wind energy is required.
  • You will need a stable internet connection and dedicated space in which to work.
  • Preservice and retired teachers are welcome!

EvaluATE webchats are an opportunity for small groups of ATE evaluation community members to come together to share and learn from each other in real-time. Anyone interested in evaluation is welcome to attend. Participants are encouraged to turn on their webcams and join in the conversation, offering a great opportunity to network.

This hands-on tutorial will introduce users to the Gr-ResQ (‘graphene rescue’) platform. Gr-ResQ is (i) an open, crowd-sourced database of recipes and characterization of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, (ii) a set of analysis tools that enable users to analyze the database, and (iii) an online cyber-physical manufacturing network that provides access to distributed CVD reactors in the form of online transactions. The purpose of Gr-ResQ is to enable wide-scale sharing of data around CVD synthesis of graphene in order to advance community knowledge of the synthesis process. Gr-ResQ was developed in collaboration with the Materials Data Facility and with the Operating System for Cyberphysical Manufacturing. You may read more about Gr-ResQ here.  In this tutorial, you will learn how to access Gr-ResQ database and analysis tools on nanohub.org, learn how to search for and contribute recipes to the Gr-ResQ database, and be trained on the analysis tools available, including raman spectrum analysis and machine learning/deep learning based analysis of SEM images.

The Business & Industry Leadership Team Model (BILT)is an employer high-engagement model for college programs, projects, and grants that originated with the NSF National Convergence Technology Center (DUE 1700530) in the early 2000s. The model is widely used to deepen employer involvement in educational programs producing such benefits as a curriculum better-aligned to meet employer needs, increased support for recruitment of students, and others. The two webinars on March 16 and 24 together will provide high-level coverage of the many specifics that make the model work.  The origins of the BILT will be explained to set the context; key details ranging from employer recruitment to using a structured, repeatable process for the employers to prioritize the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities desired in the “workforce-ready” graduates in the future will be explained; model variants for colleges, NSF ATE projects, and NSF ATE Centers will be discussed; resources will be identified, and questions will be answered. Participants who attend both sessions will receive a certificate of completion from MNT-EC.

Thermal evaporation is a technique used in the nanotechnology industry to deposit thin films of materials on substrates. In this workshop, you’ll learn about how thermal evaporation works and what type of materials and products involve thermal evaporation. At the end of the session, you’ll see a real-world example of thermal evaporation in action using a low-cost set-up that you can build in your lab and use with students.

This hands-on tutorial will introduce users to the Gr-ResQ (‘graphene rescue’) platform. Gr-ResQ is (i) an open, crowd-sourced database of recipes and characterization of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, (ii) a set of analysis tools that enable users to analyze the database, and (iii) an online cyber-physical manufacturing network that provides access to distributed CVD reactors in the form of online transactions. The purpose of Gr-ResQ is to enable wide-scale sharing of data around CVD synthesis of graphene in order to advance community knowledge of the synthesis process. Gr-ResQ was developed in collaboration with the Materials Data Facility and with the Operating System for Cyberphysical Manufacturing. You may read more about Gr-ResQ here.  In this tutorial, you will learn how to access Gr-ResQ database and analysis tools on nanohub.org, learn how to search for and contribute recipes to the Gr-ResQ database, and be trained on the analysis tools available, including raman spectrum analysis and machine learning/deep learning based analysis of SEM images.